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Pleural fluid smear

Pleural fluid smear is a laboratory test to check for bacteria, fungi, or abnormal cells in a sample of the fluid that has collected in the pleural space. This is the space between the lining of the outside of the lungs (pleura) and the wall of the chest. When fluid collects in the pleural space, the condition is called pleural effusion .

How the Test is Performed

A procedure called thoracentesis  is used to get a sample of pleural fluid. The health care provider examines a sample of pleural fluid under the microscope. If bacteria or fungi are found, other methods may be used to further identify those organisms.

How to Prepare for the Test

No special preparation is needed before the test. A chest x-ray will be performed before and after the test.

Do not cough, breathe deeply, or move during the test to avoid injury to the lung.

How the Test will Feel

For thoracentesis, you sit on the edge of a chair or bed with your head and arms resting on a table. The health care provider cleans the skin around the insertion site. Numbing medicine (anesthetic) is injected into the skin.

A needle is placed through the skin and muscles of the chest wall into the space around the lungs, called the pleural space. As fluid drains into a collection bottle, you may cough a bit. This is because your lung re-expands to fill the space where fluid had been. This sensation lasts for a few hours after the test.

Why the Test is Performed

The test is performed if you have a pleural effusion and its cause is not known, especially if the health care provider suspects an infection or cancer.

Normal Results

Normally, no bacteria, fungi, or cancer cells are present in the pleural fluid.

Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.

What Abnormal Results Mean

Positive results may indicate that infection, or cancer cells, are present. Other tests can help identify the specific type of infection or cancer. Sometimes, the test may show abnormalities from conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus .

Risks

Risks of thoracentesis are:

References

Broaddus VC, Light RW. Pleural effusion. In: Mason RJ, Martin TR, Broaddus VC, et al., eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2010:chap 73.

Karcher DS. McPherson RA. Cerebrospinal, synovial, serous body fluids, and alternative specimens. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 22nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 29.

Updated: 12/3/2013

Denis Hadjiliadis, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.


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