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Confusion

Confusion is the inability to think as clearly or quickly as you normally do. You may feel disoriented and have difficulty paying attention, remembering, and making decisions.

Alternative Names

Disorientation; Thinking - unclear; Thoughts - cloudy

Considerations

Confusion may come on quickly or slowly over time, depending on the cause. Many times, confusion lasts for a short time and goes away. Other times, it is permanent and not curable. It may be associated with delirium or dementia.

Confusion is more common in the elderly and often occurs during a hospital stay.

Some confused people may have strange or unusual behavior or may act aggressively.

Causes

Confusion may be caused by different health problems, such as:

Home Care

A good way to find out if someone is confused is to ask the person his or her name, age, and the date. If they are unsure or answer incorrectly, they are confused.

If the person does not usually have confusion, call a doctor.

A confused person should not be left alone. For safety, the person may need physical restraints.

To help a confused person:

  • Always introduce yourself, no matter how well the person once knew you.
  • Often remind the person of his or her location.
  • Place a calendar and clock near the person.
  • Talk about current events and plans for the day.
  • Try to keep the surroundings calm, quiet, and peaceful.

For sudden confusion due to low blood sugar (for example, from diabetes medication), the person should drink a sweet drink or eat a sweet snack. If the confusion lasts longer than 10 minutes, call the doctor.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call 911 if confusion has come on suddenly or there are other symptoms, such as:

  • Cold or clammy skin
  • Dizziness or feeling faint
  • Fast pulse
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Slow or rapid breathing
  • Uncontrolled shivering

Also call 911 if:

  • Confusion has come on suddenly in someone with diabetes
  • Confusion came on after a head injury
  • The person becomes unconscious at any time

If you have been experiencing confusion, call for an appointment with your doctor.

What to Expect at Your Office Visit

The doctor will do a physical examination and ask questions about the confusion. The doctor will ask questions to learn if the person knows the date, the time, and where he or she is. Questions about recent and ongoing illness, among other questions, will also be asked.

Tests that may ordered include:

Treatment depends on the cause of the confusion. For example, if an infection is causing the confusion, treating the infection will likely clear the confusion.

References

Huff JS. Confusion. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al., eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Mosby; 2013:chap 17.

Somes J. Sudden confusion and agitation: causes to investigate! Delirium, dementia, depression. J Emerg Nurs. 2010;36:486-488.

Updated: 2/20/2014

Joseph V. Campellone, M.D., Division of Neurology, Cooper University Hospital, Camden, NJ. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.


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