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Chin augmentation

A chin augmentation is a surgical procedure to reshape or enhance the size of the chin. It may be done either by inserting an implant or by moving or reshaping bones.

Surgery may be performed in the surgeon's office, a hospital, or an outpatient clinic.

You will have x-rays taken of your face and chin. The doctor will use these x-rays to find out what part of the chin to operate on.

When you need only an implant to round out the chin:

  • You may be under general anesthesia (asleep and pain-free), or you may get medicine to numb the area, along with a medicine that will make you relaxed and sleepy.
  • A cut is made, either inside the mouth or outside under the chin. A pocket is created in front of the chin bone and under the muscles. The implant is placed inside.
  • The surgeon may use real bone or fat tissue, or an implant made out of silicone, Teflon™, Dacron, or newer biological inserts.
  • The implant is usually attached to the bone with sutures or screws.
  • Sutures are used to close the surgical cut. When the cut is inside the mouth, the scar can barely be seen.

The surgeon may also need to move some bones:

  • You will likely be under general anesthesia.
  • The surgeon will make a cut inside your mouth along the lower gum. This gives the surgeon access to the chin bone.
  • The surgeon uses a bone saw or chisel to make a second cut through the jaw bone. The jaw bone is moved and wired or screwed in place.
  • The cut is closed with stitches and a bandage is applied. Because the surgery is performed inside your mouth, you will not see any scars.
  • The procedure takes between 1 and 3 hours.

Chin augmentation is commonly done at the same time as a nose job (rhinoplasty ) or facial liposuction (when fat is removed from under the chin and neck).

Surgery to correct bite problems can be done at the same time as chin surgery.

Alternative Names

Augmentation mentoplasty; Genioplasty

Why the Procedure Is Performed

Chin augmentation is usually done to balance the face by making the chin longer or bigger compared to the nose. The best candidates for chin augmentation are people with weak or receding chins (microgenia), but who have a normal bite.

Before your surgery, discuss how you want to look and feel with the plastic surgeon. Keep in mind that the desired result is improvement, not perfection.

Risks

The most common complications of chin augmentation are:

  • Bruising
  • Movement of the implant
  • Swelling

Other possible complications include:

  • Damage to the teeth
  • Loss of feeling

Rare side effects include:

  • Infection -- sometimes the implant will have to be removed
  • Pain that does not go away
  • Numbness or other changes in feeling to the skin

Although most patients are happy with the outcome, poor cosmetic results that may need more surgery include:

  • Wounds that do not heal well
  • Scarring
  • Unevenness of the face
  • Fluid that collects under the skin
  • Irregular skin shape (contour)

Nicotine from smoking can delay healing.

After the Procedure

You will feel some discomfort and soreness, which you can easily control with medication.

You may feel some numbness in your chin for up to 3 months, and a stretching sensation around your chin for 1 week. Most of the swelling will be gone by 6 weeks, depending on the type of procedure you had.

You might have to stick to a liquid or soft diet for at least a day or two.

You'll probably have the outside bandage removed within a week of surgery. You may be asked to wear a brace while you are sleeping for 4 - 6 weeks.

You can resume light activity the day of surgery. You should be able to return to work and your usual activities within 7 - 10 days. Your doctor or nurse will give you specific instructions.

Outlook (Prognosis)

If the cut was made under the chin, the scar should not be noticeable.

Most implants are good for life. However, implants made from bone or fat tissue that was taken from your body will sometimes be reabsorbed.

Because you may have some swelling for months, you might not see the final appearance of your chin and jaw for 3 - 4 months.

References

Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery.

Updated: 2/11/2013

Reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang. Previously reviewed by David A. Lickstein, MD, FACS, specializing in cosmetic and reconstructive plastic surgery, Palm Beach Gardens, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. (11/16/2011)


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