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Iodine in diet

Iodine is a trace mineral and a nutrient found naturally in the body.

Alternative Names

Diet - iodine

Function

Iodine is needed for the normal metabolism of cells. Metabolism is the process of converting food into energy. Humans need iodine for normal thyroid function, and for the production of thyroid hormones.

Food Sources

Iodized salt is table salt with iodine added. It is the main food source of iodine.

Seafood is naturally rich in iodine. Cod, sea bass, haddock, and perch are good sources.

Kelp is the most common vegetable-seafood that is a rich source of iodine.

Dairy products also contain iodine.

Other good sources are plants grown in iodine-rich soil.

Side Effects

Lack of enough iodine (deficiency) may occur in places that have iodine-poor soil. Many months of iodine deficiency in a person's diet may cause goiter or hypothyroidism . Without enough iodine, the thyroid cells and the thyroid gland become enlarged.

Deficiency happens more often in women than in men, and is more common in pregnant women and older children. Getting enough iodine in the diet may prevent a form of physical and intellectual disability called cretinism. Cretinism is very rare in the U.S. because iodine deficiency is generally not a problem.

Iodine poisoning is rare in the U.S. Very high intake of iodine can reduce the function of the thyroid gland.

Recommendations

The best way to get the daily requirement of essential vitamins is to eat a balanced diet that contains a variety of foods from the food guide plate.

A 1/4 teaspoon of iodized table salt provides 95 micrograms of iodine. A 6-ounce portion of ocean fish provides 650 micrograms of iodine. Most people are able to meet the daily recommendations by eating seafood, iodized salt, and plants grown in iodine-rich soil. When buying salt make sure it is labeled "iodized."

The Food and Nutrition Board at the Institute of Medicine recommends the following dietary intake for iodine:

Infants

  • 0 - 6 months: 110 micrograms per day (mcg/day)
  • 7 - 12 months: 130 mcg/day

Children

  • 1 - 3 years: 90 mcg/day
  • 4 - 8 years: 90 mcg/day
  • 9 - 13 years: 120 mcg/day

Adolescents and Adults

  • Males age 14 and older: 150 mcg/day
  • Females age 14 and older: 150 mcg/day

Specific recommendations depend on age, gender, and other factors (such as pregnancy). Women who are pregnant or producing breast milk (lactating) need higher amounts. Ask your health care provider which amount is best for you.

References

Mason JB. Vitamins, trace minerals, and other micronutrients. In: Goldman L, Ausiello D, eds. Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 225.

Institute of Medicine. Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine,Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. National Academy Press, Washington, DC, 2001.

Updated: 2/18/2013

Alison Evert, MS, RD, CDE, Nutritionist, University of Washington Medical Center Diabetes Care Center, Seattle, Washington. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, David R. Eltz, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.


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