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Nausea and acupressure

Alternative Names

Acupressure and nausea

Information

Acupressure is an ancient Chinese method that involves placing pressure on an area of your body, using your fingers or other device, to make you feel better. It is similar to acupuncture. Acupressure and acupuncture work by changing the pain messages that nerves send to your brain.

Sometimes mild nausea, even morning sickness, may improve by using your middle and index fingers to press firmly down on the groove between the two large tendons on the inside of your wrist that start at the base of your palm.

Special wristbands to help relieve nausea are sold over the counter at many stores. When the band is worn around the wrist, it presses upon the same or similar pressure points just described. The bands are not expensive and are reported to work for at least some people

Acupuncture is often used for nausea or vomiting related to chemotherapy for cancer.

References

 

Dibble SL, et al. Acupressure for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a randomized clinical trial. Oncol Nurs Forum 2007;34(4):813-20.

Lee A, Fan LTY. Stimulation of the wrist acupuncture point P6 for preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2009, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD003281.

Updated: 12/15/2011

David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine; Yi-Bin Chen, MD, Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Massachusetts General Hospital. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.


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