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Psychosis

Psychosis occurs when a person loses contact with reality. The person may:

  • Have false beliefs about what is taking place, or who one is (delusions).
  • See or hear things that are not there (hallucinations).

Causes

Medical problems that can cause psychosis include:

Psychosis may also be found in:

Symptoms

A person with psychosis may have any of the following:

  • Disorganized thought and speech
  • False beliefs that are not based in reality (delusions), especially unfounded fear or suspicion
  • Hearing, seeing, or feeling things that are not there (hallucinations )
  • Thoughts that "jump" between unrelated topics (disordered thinking)

Exams and Tests

Psychiatric evaluation and testing are used to diagnose the cause of the psychosis.

Laboratory testing and brain scans may not be needed, but sometimes can help pinpoint the diagnosis. Tests may include:

  • Blood tests for abnormal electrolyte and hormone levels
  • Blood tests for syphilis and other infections
  • Drug screens
  • MRI of the brain

Treatment

Treatment depends on the cause of the psychosis. Care in a hospital is often needed to ensure the patient's safety.

Antipsychotic drugs, which reduce hallucinations and delusions and improve thinking and behavior, are helpful.

Outlook (Prognosis)

How well a person does depends on the cause of the psychosis. If the cause can be corrected, the outlook is often good. In this case, treatment with antipsychotic medication may be brief.

Some chronic conditions, such as schizophrenia, may need life-long treatment with antipsychotic medications to control symptoms.

Possible Complications

Psychosis can prevent people from functioning normally and caring for themselves. Left untreated, people can sometimes harm themselves or others.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your health care provider or mental health professional if you or a member of your family is losing contact with reality. If there is any concern about safety, take the person to the emergency room to be seen by a doctor.

Prevention

Prevention depends on the cause. For example, avoiding alcohol abuse prevents alcohol-induced psychosis.

References

American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 5th ed. Arlington, Va: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013.

Freudenreich O, Weiss AP, Goff DC. Psychosis and schizophrenia. In: Stern TA, Rosenbaum JF, Fava M, et al., eds. Massachusetts General Hospital Comprehensive Clinical Psychiatry. 1st ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Mosby; 2008:chap 28.

Updated: 2/24/2014

Fred K. Berger, MD, Addiction and Forensic Psychiatrist, Scripps Memorial Hospital, La Jolla, California. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.


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