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Intestinal Rehabilitation and Transplant Center at UPMC

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Leading the Way in Intestinal Health

The goal of intestinal rehabilitation is to restore lifestyle and diet, and increase overall quality of life with the remaining bowel.

UPMC's Intestinal Rehabilitation and Transplantation Center (IRTC) offers clinical expertise and treatment for people with:

  • Short bowel syndrome
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Vascular occlusion
  • Abdominal trauma
  • Other gut disorders, combined with organ failure

We utilize a multidisciplinary team approach, collaborating with many ancillary services at UPMC to provide our patients with the highest quality medical and social support.

Which Treatment Option is Right for Me?

Medical Intervention

New pharmacologic agents are available to help the intestine improve its function in combination with diet modification, surgical intervention, or other novel therapies.

Nutrition Management

Our specialized dietitians collaborate with physicians, pharmacists, and nurses to develop patient-specific nutritional plans for optimal outcomes. They also utilize enteral nutrition, or tube feeding, if intravenous support is necessary in the hospital, at clinic appointments, or at your home.

Surgical Rehabilitation

We offer various surgical intervention techniques — tailored to your individual needs — for managing short bowel syndrome without the need for intestinal transplant. These procedures are meant to lengthen the bowel, making it more efficient at absorbing nutrients from food.

Intestinal Transplantation

If the length of your remaining bowel is extremely short, or your intestinal disease is associated with liver failure, you may benefit from intestinal transplantation. Potential candidates include those with irreversible intestinal failure that requires additional intervention beyond surgical rehabilitation.

At the IRTC, our team of surgeons, gastroenterologists, nurse coordinators, and dietitians will collaborate to discuss the most appropriate treatment option for you, ensuring that you understand the benefits and risks.

Where Do I Start?

Please fill out the form to learn more information from one of our experts about our treatment options for intestinal disorders.

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